Using Thoracic Radiographs to Differentiate Pulmonary and Cardiac Diseases in Dogs and Cats

There are several reasons we take thoracic radiographs. These include a noted heart murmur, screening for metastatic disease, evaluating for clinical problems such as a fever of unknown origin or most commonly, for the evaluation of a patient coughing or having respiratory distress. In this article, we will review lung patterns and distributions of common pulmonary diseases while putting the clinical picture together. Radiographic Lung Patterns in Dogs and Cats  Lung patterns are simply the…

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Using Bandage Contact Lenses for Dogs and Cats

Contact lenses are used increasingly to provide pain management and to promote corneal healing. There are animal specific bandage lenses as well as human bandage lenses on the market. The human bandage lenses can be used in animals. The sizes of the bandage contact lens are as follows: Human bandage contact lenses are typically 14mm Diameter/8.6 Base Curve/0 Power Dog bandage contact lenses range from 15.5 to 22mm Diameter/8.5 to 11.8 Base Curve/0 Power Cat…

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Two Common Pitfalls of Abdominal Radiographs in Dogs and Cats

Two Common Pitfalls of Abdominal Radiographs in Dogs and Cats The following are two findings on abdominal radiographs that I see commonly misdiagnosed in dogs and cats. Below are two tips that may help you interpret x-rays in your veterinary patients. Tip #1.  Be Careful Not to Mistake the Pylorus as Soft Tissue Mass  On a right lateral abdominal radiograph, the pylorus of the stomach (being on the right of midline) is dependent and is…

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