Treatment of Hypothermia in Dogs and Cats

Learn about the possible causes of hypothemia in dogs and cats, the impact on body organs, and life-saving treatment recommendations.   Hypothermia is defined by a core body temperature lower than 35 degree C (95-degree F)[1]. Below this temperature, the body loses more heat than it generates. Hypothermia can be caused by metabolic dysfunction in association with decreased heat production (hypothyroidism, hypoglycemia, hypoperfusion, or hypoaldosteronism) or disturbed thermoregulation (intracranial disease, diffuse neurological disease or…

Read More

Treating Viral and Bacterial Conjunctivitis in Cats

The most common cause of conjunctivitis in cats is feline herpes virus (FHV-1). Most cats are exposed to the feline herpes virus within the first few weeks of life.  At the time of exposure, kittens may develop conjunctivitis (Figure 1). Figure 1. Cat with conjunctivitis: blepharoedema, chemosis, hyperemia and tearing Viral conjunctivitis is usually self-limiting and often does not require treatment. If the symptoms do not resolve, treatment with a topical and/or…

Read More

Veterinary Regulatory Update: USP Compounding Revisions

USP to Delay Official Implementation of Updates to Compounding Chapters 795 and 797  The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) released information earlier this fall stating their decision to delay the official implementation of published revisions to general chapters 795 (non-sterile compounding) and 797 (sterile compounding). They additionally will be delaying the implementation of a new chapter associated with radiopharmaceutical compounding (chapter 825). In accordance with USP’s Bylaws, the responsible Expert Committees worked with a sense of…

Read More