Canine Epilepsy: Current Ideas and Therapies

Epilepsy is the most common neurologic condition within the domesticated dog. Epilepsy in itself is a complex disease and by this very nature can make one patient easy to treat while the next drug-resistant. Epilepsy itself is defined as the enduring predisposition of having epileptic seizures. An epileptic seizure is defined as a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. Common clinical signs of epileptic…

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Radiology View: What’s Your Read? 13-year-old Dog with Abdominal Pain

Radiology View: What’s Your Read? Patient Presentation: A 13-year-old, spayed female, Golden Retriever presented for vomiting, lethargy, and suspected discomfort. Cranial abdominal discomfort was noted during the physical examination. The following radiographs were made. View the radiographs below and consider the following questions: What are your radiographic findings? What are your differential diagnoses? What would you suggest as your next step for this patient? Figure 1. Lateral abdominal radiograph. Figure 2.

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Cholecalciferol Poisoning in Dogs and Cats

Ingestion of rodenticides by companion animals is consistently one of the most common intoxications in veterinary medicine. Historically, second-generation anticoagulants were the most common active ingredient in rodenticides. Though there was the potential for life-threatening hemorrhage within 72 hours of ingestion, an inexpensive antidote (vitamin K1) was available and effective if administered prior to clinical signs. In 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) enacted regulations banning the use of second-generation anticoagulants in residential rodenticides. This…

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