Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Radiation Oncology in Dogs and Cats

Frequently Asked Questions about Radiation Oncology in Dogs and Cats It can be scary and confusing when your dog or cat is diagnosed with cancer. The following are some of the questions that we receive regarding Veterinary Radiation Oncology. If you have a question that is not listed here, please give us a call. How soon after a cancer diagnosis should I talk with a veterinary Radiation Oncologist? Tumors grow at varying rates; some doubling…

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Radiation Therapy in Dogs and Cats

Your Doctors: Deborah M. Prescott, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVR Heather A. Lasher, DVM, DACVR Jenny R. Schutte, DVM, PhD Candidate Types of Radiation Therapy  Full Course Radiation Therapy Full course RT is also known as definitive or curative RT.  The goal of full course RT is long-term tumor control. For best results, this type of RT is often combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy.  Typically, one treatment or fraction is given per day (Mon–Fri) over…

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Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) in Dogs

Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common canine tumor of the bladder and urethra.  At this time, the cause of transitional cell carcinoma is not known.  Exposure to carcinogenic compounds is suspected to be a contributing factor, but very few specific agents have been identified. TCC is seen more commonly in female dogs than males.  Certain breeds, including Scottish terriers, West Highland White terriers, Airedales, Collies, Shelties, and Beagles, appear to be predisposed. Clinical…

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Lymphoma in Dogs and Cats

The lymphomas (malignant lymphoma or lymphosarcoma) are a diverse group of cancers that originate from a type of white blood cell called a lymphocyte. Lymphoma is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in dogs and cats. This cancer usually arises in lymph tissues such as lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and bone marrow; however, it can arise in almost any tissue in the body. In the cat, it is most commonly found in the intestinal…

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Mast Cell Tumors in Dogs

Mast cell tumors (MCT) in dogs are very common, accounting for approximately 20% of all skin tumors diagnosed in dogs. Mast cell tumors can arise from any skin site on the body, and can have a variety of appearances.  We do not know what causes mast cell tumors in dogs. At this time, no carcinogenic agents or viral organisms have been found to directly cause MCT. Symptoms of a Mast Cell Tumor MCTs most commonly…

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