What Is Tear Staining in Dogs? How Do I Treat It?

Everything You Wanted to Know About Tear Stains in Dogs   Pet owners often seek advice on how to treat the messy, frustrating problem of tear staining in dogs. If you research online the phrase “tear staining”, you will find numerous different products, ideas, and suggestions that claim to fix or prevent the staining. The fact that there are so many products available means that there is not ONE magic treatment or approach that will…

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Uveitis in Dogs & Cats

The uvea is the major blood supply to the eye and is comprised of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid. These major structures of the eye are very sensitive and perform numerous functions required for ocular homeostasis and vision. Uveitis is inflammation of these structures and results in pain, cloudiness to the intraocular fluids, and in severe cases, blindness. Uveitis can occur for many reasons, and depending on what the ophthalmologist finds on your pet’s…

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Cataracts & Cataract Surgery in Dogs

What are Cataracts in Dogs? A cataract is an opacity or “clouding” of the eye lens. Cataracts in dogs impair vision by preventing light from focusing properly on the retina, resulting in poor vision or blindness. Cataracts can affect dogs of all ages. They are usually inherited, with some breeds being more susceptible than others. More susceptible breeds include Poodles, Bichon Frise, Retrievers, Terriers, and Cocker Spaniels. Other causes of cataracts are age and diabetes.

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Indolent Ulcers in Dogs

Indolent ulcers, or recurrent ulcers, are a specific type corneal ulcer in which the outer layer of the cornea (the epithelium) will not adhere to the underlying layer (the stroma).  This condition often times occurs spontaneously in dogs over 6 years of age.  Certain breeds of dogs (Boxers) are more commonly affected.  Regardless of the cause, these ulcers can persist for months if left untreated, causing pain and scar formation. Most Common Therapy for Indolent…

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Feline Herpes Virus & Eosinophilic Keratitis

Feline herpes virus is the most common cause of corneal and conjunctival disease in cats.  It can be a most frustrating disease to manage for the patient, the owner, and the doctor. This virus cannot be spread from a cat to other species, including humans. Almost every cat most (greater than 90%) has been exposed to herpes, but not every cat develops symptoms. Clinical Signs of Feline Herpes Virus  The clinical signs of feline herpes…

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