Foods to Avoid, and Others Pets Love

To help celebrate Responsible Pet Owners Month, our experts have compiled a list of toxic foods for pets, along with a list of foods our pets often enjoy. Have questions? We encourage you to speak with your family veterinarian. Foods to avoid While not an exhaustive list, below are some of the most common foods that can be toxic to your pets. Alcohol can be poisonous to pets & in some cases, can lead to…

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How to Keep Your Pet Safe This Valentine’s Day

Each year around Valentine’s Day, we provide Emergency care to cats and dogs who have eaten flowers or candy that were gifts for their owners. Below are some of the more common Valentine’s Day pet hazards and tips on how to keep your pet safe. A Valentine’s Day favorite, chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine that is highly toxic to dogs. The darker the chocolate, the greater the concentration of theobromine. Ingesting even small amounts…

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Lyme Disease Safety Precautions

According to the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC), Lyme disease is on the rise with over 300,000 cases diagnosed every year. In order to keep pets safe and healthy, it is important that pet owners remain aware of the following tips and Lyme Disease safety precautions. Lyme disease is caused by a bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi which is transferred to both humans and animals by ticks. Thoroughly checking pets for ticks daily can help reduce…

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Dogs Beware of Xylitol- Toxic Ingredient in Some Peanut Butters!

Veterinarians commonly recommend peanut butter as a way for pet owners to give dogs their pills. However, care must be taken when choosing which peanut butter to use based on the addition of xylitol to some peanut butter brands. Xylitol is a sweetener used in gum, baked goods and many products designed for people with Diabetes due to its low glycemic index and low calorie content. Xylitol is highly toxic to some dogs, causing low…

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Marijuana Intoxication in Dogs and Cats

“As marijuana is being legalized in more states and its use is becoming more widespread where it’s not legal, we’re seeing more intoxications,” says MedVet Columbus criticalist Natashia Evans, BVSc, DACVECC. “When users compound the drug with a fatty solution like oil or butter, two things happen. The toxicity increases and the risk of pets getting into it increases too.” Evans says that a dog that has ingested a comparatively small amount of the compounded…

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