Outpatient Protocol for Dogs with Parvoviral Enteritis

Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a serious and potentially fatal viral illness that remains common in dogs, despite the availability and efficacy of vaccinations. Without treatment, parvoviral enteritis has a mortality rate in excess of 90%. Hospitalization and aggressive care can decrease mortality to 10-30%; however, this approach is often cost prohibitive. In this article, we will review an outpatient protocol for dogs with parvoviral enteritis. There has been recent investigation into the efficacy and safety…

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Common Toxins That Cause Acute Kidney Injury in Dogs and Cats

At MedVet, we treat dogs and cats for ingestion of kidney toxins on at least a weekly, sometimes even daily, basis. In this article we will review common toxins causing acute kidney injury in dogs and cats,¬†how we prevent and treat the renal effects, and how we monitor for acute kidney injury. NSAID Toxicity in Dogs and Cats Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce inflammation and pain via the inhibition of COX enzymes, preventing the conversion…

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Understanding Blood Lactate Levels in Dogs with Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV)

Measuring blood lactate levels in dogs with Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV) can guide you on your resuscitation efforts and help you better understand the prognosis as you communicate with dog owners. Below are tips on measuring blood lactates that may help you in your practice. What is a Blood Lactate Actually Measuring? Lactic acid is a weak acid and dissociates into lactate (-) and H+. Normally glucose is converted into pyruvate via glycolysis in the…

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Cannabis (Marijuana) Toxicity in Dogs and Cats

Cannabis toxicity in dogs and cats is becoming increasingly common. Cannabis has become legalized for both medicinal and recreational use in many states, leading to increased access and development of more potent forms. As access increases and public opinion of cannabis is changing, toxicity is both occurring more frequently and being reported more readily. An understanding of the available formulations and pharmacology of cannabis can be advantageous in the approach to the intoxicated patient. Marijuana…

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Warming the Hypothermic Canine and Feline Patient

Warming the Hypothermic Canine and Feline Patient Hypothermia commonly occurs in critically ill or injured canine and feline patients as a result of excessive heat loss, decreased metabolism and/or loss of the ability to thermoregulate at the level of the autonomic nervous system. Passive external rewarming by covering the patient with a blanket or towel may be sufficient in warming mildly hypothermic patients. This method minimizes heat loss to the surrounding environment and relies on…

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