Selected Viral Dermatoses in Dogs

The increase in social interaction in dogs associated with the growing popularity of dog parks and dog day care facilities has resulted in an increase in canine patients presenting with papilloma virus associated dermatoses. Papillomaviruses are non- enveloped DNA viruses, which are transmitted by direct and indirect contact and specifically infect epithelial cells. Infection occurs at the site of damaged skin or mucous membranes with viral incubation lasting 1 to 2 months. Papillomavirus is fairly…

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Lessons Learned from Using Apoquel in Dogs

Apoquel has been more consistently available during the past year affording the opportunity to appreciate where best to consider its use. Apoquel has been effective in managing pruritus in the majority of patients treated with approximately 80% demonstrating excellent response within 48 to 72 hours of treatment with b.i.d. dosing. Some patients will develop a significant degree of pruritus near the end of the 24-hour dosing period when the dose is reduced to once daily.

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IL-31 for Canine Atopic Dermatitis

Zoetis has been granted conditional release of their Canine Atopic Dermatitis Immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibody against IL-31. This injection has been developed for managing pruritus in dogs by binding their IL-31 with a monoclonal antibody. Like Apoquel (oclacitinib), it has the potential to reduce pruritus within 24 to 48 hours with a single subcutaneous injection lasting up to 3 to 6 weeks depending on the dose and responsiveness of the patient. Approximately 90% of patients respond…

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Using Bravecto for Treating Demodex in Dogs

The oral flea and tick preventives, Bravecto, NexGard, and Simparica, have been evaluated for their efficacy against Demodex canis. When the normal flea and tick preventative dose is administered as directed an excellent response against Demodex canis mites has been reported in peer reviewed journals. Concurrent therapy with oral ivermectin is not contraindicated but should not be required. Most treated patients should resolve their demodicosis within a few months of therapy. A recently published Journal…

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