Radiology View: What’s Your Read? 13-year-old Dog with Abdominal Pain

Radiology View: What’s Your Read? Patient Presentation: A 13-year-old, spayed female, Golden Retriever presented for vomiting, lethargy, and suspected discomfort. Cranial abdominal discomfort was noted during the physical examination. The following radiographs were made. View the radiographs below and consider the following questions: What are your radiographic findings? What are your differential diagnoses? What would you suggest as your next step for this patient? Figure 1. Lateral abdominal radiograph. Figure 2. Ventrodorsal abdominal…

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Two Important Tips for Taking Radiographs in Your Practice

We would like to share two important tips for taking radiographs in your practice. These tips include the benefit of three-view and left lateral thoracic and abdominal radiographs. TIP 1: 3-VIEW THORACIC AND ABDOMINAL X-RAYS IN DOGS AND CATS OVER 2-VIEW STUDIES Obtaining two-view radiographs in dogs and cats has long been common practice, most frequently acquiring right lateral and ventrodorsal (VD) projections. The more contemporary standard of care is three-view thoracic and abdominal radiographic studies…

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When and How to Perform a Pneumocolon in Dogs

At times, it is essential to confirm the location of the large intestine on radiographs when determining if an intestinal lesion warrants surgical intervention.  Negative contrast colonography, aka pneumocolon, is indicated to determine whether a foreign body or obstructive pattern is small intestinal in origin or to investigate large intestinal lesions such as intussusceptions and intraluminal masses.  All you need is a large syringe, air and a long catheter (red rubber or Foley will do).

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Diagnosing Intussusception with the Meniscus Sign in Dogs

Intestinal intussusception occurs when the bowel telescopes within an adjacent bowel segment due to discrepancies in localized bowel motility and is categorized by the location of origin.  A portion of the mesentery and its vascular supply is oftentimes incorporated into the intussusception.  Intussusception can be detected on palpation as a tubular soft tissue mass.  Underlying bowel disease precipitates this lesion in many cases including viral enteritis and intestinal parasitism/infections in young dogs and neoplasia in…

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The Dyspneic Cat – Is it the Heart or Lower Airways?

Almost daily, I encounter a radiographic study of a cat in respiratory distress and commonly, the etiology is either congestive heart failure (CHF) or chronic small airway disease such as asthma.  Congestive heart failure has a predictable set of radiographic findings as described below and easier to discern from asthmatic cases.  Asthmatic cases can be challenging to diagnose radiographically as many appear normal or have a questionable bronchial lung pattern even in the most severely…

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