What You Should Know About Lumps & Bumps on Dogs

What You Should Know About Lumps & Bumps on Dogs “Check lump”, “New mass”, “Skin Swelling”, Check Growth – Owner thinks it’s bigger”, “Mass bleeding”, “Dog licking growth”, and “Groomer found a lump”. Lumps and bumps are common presenting concerns for pet owners and a frequent physical exam finding for veterinarians. Not every mass that presents needs prompt surgical intervention, but every mass warrants our concern and attention as if it does. Best Practices for…

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Understanding the Use of Arthroscopy in Dogs

Arthroscopy has become the mainstay of most surgeries involving joint evaluation in human medicine and has grown in popularity in veterinary medicine. Arthroscopy can be thought of as the pinnacle of minimally invasive surgery; prior to its usage, the open arthrotomy was used for joint evaluation. There are numerous advantages to minimally invasive surgery when compared to an open procedure in dogs. Arthroscopy can be utilized in cats, however due to size limitations, this is…

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Partial Cruciate (CrCL) Ruptures in Dogs

Diagnosis and Causes of Partial Cruciate (CrCL) Ruptures in Dogs  Hind limb lameness is a very common presenting complaint in clinical practice. Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) disease is the cause of lameness in a significant number of those pets. When a patient has an obvious cranial tibial thrust and/or drawer motion on exam, most veterinarians feel comfortable guiding the client towards surgical stabilization and a great long-term outcome. But what about the patient with lameness localized to…

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3 Common Questions About Canine Total Hip Replacement

3 Common Questions About Canine Total Hip Replacement We commonly get questions about total hip replacement surgery in dogs. Here are the most common questions answered. What size and age must a dog be in order to be considered for total hip replacement? Since the introduction of the micro and nano total hip replacement systems (Figure 1) we can now perform this surgery in dogs and cats as small as ~ 4 kg and there is…

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Neurosurgery Update: Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator

Traditionally, central nervous system masses have been debulked manually which can lead to iatrogenic trauma, prolonged anesthesia, a larger residual mass burden, and many other unwanted effects.  Ultrasonic aspiration helps to solve for these issues and has been used for years in state-of-the-art human neurosurgery. The Columbus Neurosurgery Department now routinely uses a cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA).  The CUSA simultaneously fragments pathologic tissue while providing suction and irrigation.  It distinguishes pathologic tissue from normal…

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