When and How to Perform a Pneumocolon in Dogs

At times, it is essential to confirm the location of the large intestine on radiographs when determining if an intestinal lesion warrants surgical intervention.  Negative contrast colonography, aka pneumocolon, is indicated to determine whether a foreign body or obstructive pattern is small intestinal in origin or to investigate large intestinal lesions such as intussusceptions and intraluminal masses.  All you need is a large syringe, air and a long catheter (red rubber or Foley will do).

Read More

Diagnosing Intussusception with the Meniscus Sign in Dogs

Intestinal intussusception occurs when the bowel telescopes within an adjacent bowel segment due to discrepancies in localized bowel motility and is categorized by the location of origin.  A portion of the mesentery and its vascular supply is oftentimes incorporated into the intussusception.  Intussusception can be detected on palpation as a tubular soft tissue mass.  Underlying bowel disease precipitates this lesion in many cases including viral enteritis and intestinal parasitism/infections in young dogs and neoplasia in…

Read More

Tips for Diagnosing Septic Peritonitis in Dogs & Cats

Septic peritonitis is a challenging problem to diagnose and treat in dogs and cats. Early diagnosis may improve survival as it will lead to quicker surgical resolution and elimination of the septic foci. Part of the challenge is that is that the physical examination only positively predicts those that require surgery 50% of the time (Walters, 2003).  Dr. Natashia Evans and Dr. Jayme Hoffberg gives the following tips to help diagnose septic peritonitis: Tips for Diagnosing…

Read More

Evaluation of an Intra-Articular Synthetic Ligament for Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease In Dogs: A Six-Month Prospective Clinical Trial

Summary Objective: Evaluate the short-term outcomes of a novel synthetic ligament for treatment of naturally occurring canine cranial cruciate ligament disease. Study design: Prospective clinical study. Animals: Dogs with unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease (n = 50). Methods: Patient parameters evaluated included a five-point lameness score, evaluation of craniocaudal stifle instability, and radiographic findings over 24 weeks. Any postoperative complications were recorded. Results: Thirty-four out of 42 dogs experienced significant improvements…

Read More

What is the Best Age to Perform Spays & Neuters?

There is an increasing, though controversial, body of evidence calling into question the pros and cons that early spay/neuter may have on cats and dogs.  The AVMA, “supports the concept of pediatric spay/neuter in dogs and cats in an effort to reduce the number of unwanted animals of these species.”   Our professional association also advises that, “veterinarians should use their best professional judgment based on the current scientific literature in deciding at what age spay/neuter…

Read More