Iatrogenic Hyperadrenocorticism in Dogs (Cushing’s Syndrome)

Hyperadrenocorticism in dogs may occur spontaneously or may be iatrogenic from the administration of glucocorticoids (GC) like prednisone (a steroid). Spontaneous hyperadrenocorticism is pituitary dependent (most commonly a pituitary gland adenoma producing ACTH hormone that signals the adrenal gland to produce cortisol hormone without feedback regulation) or adrenal dependent from an adrenal tumor (tumor produces excess cortisol without feedback regulation). The excess cortisol is responsible for the clinical signs and abnormalities seen with hyperadrenocorticism…

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Hypothyroidism and Skin Changes in Dogs

Hypothyroidism, an under production of thyroid hormone, is reported to be the most common hormonal disease in dogs. It may affect any breed as well as mixed breed dogs. Golden Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers, and Labrador Retrievers appear to be at an increased risk of developing the disease. Typically, one sees hypothyroidism in dogs between the ages of 6 and 10 years, but it can appear at 2 years of age in large and giant breeds…

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“Hot Spots” in Dogs

The term “hot spot” is commonly used by pet owners to describe localized lesional areas of skin that may or may not be itchy to the dog. “Hot spots” are a common reason dogs are presented to the veterinarian. To a veterinary dermatologist, a “hot spot” is actually a condition so bothersome to the dog that we consider it an emergency. While we understand what pet owners are trying to convey by use of the term…

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